0
points
Holes in leaves

Pepper, bell    Indiana

Every time we put new pepper and cucumber plants on our propagation tables we start getting holes in our leaves on both peppers and cucumbers. I have searched and searched for bugs of any kind to see what is eating my leaves. The only thing I can find is fungus gnats. I was told by many people that fungus gnats will not eat plants. I am really starting to doubt what people are telling me because it happens every new crop. That's the only thing I can find. We go through about 3 cycles of pepper plants a year and 8 cycles of cucumber plants. Need help to identify what is going on with these plants. Please let me know if you need pictures. Thanks in advance for any kind of knowledge on this frustrating matter.


Posted by: Dion Graber (1 point) Dion Graber
Posted: October 3, 2017

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David Hughes commented,
Can you upload an image of the damage please

3 months ago.

Dion Graber commented,
As you can see David Hughes there are fungus gnats sitting on my leaves on both peppers and cucumbers. Every time you move a Rockwool cube they just swarm up to you. Like I said before I have searched and searched for the past year trying to figure out what is chewing on my leaves. This is the only thing that I have come up with.
2 months ago.



Answers

1
point
So there are a couple things to unpack here.

First, fungus gnat larvae live in wet soil and feed primarily on fungus, hence the common name. They're generally not pestiferous, but can become an annoyance in homes when people over water their potted plants and the adults emerge and fly about. However, in the absence of fungus, larvae can feed on healthy plant roots, causing some physical damage but also creating holes in which fungus and other pathogens can enter. This is mostly a problem with newly sprouted and young plants that haven't developed a robust root system.

Fungus gnat adults don't feed on plants, their mouthparts aren't capable of it.

Finally, the fly in the photo is definitely not a fungus gnat. It's much too large and robust. It might be a shore fly, which are occasional pests in greenhouses. Shore flies feed on algae as larvae, which can be present when plants are overwatered or water is left standing. Neither the larvae or adults damage plants and, like fungus gnats, they're mostly just annoying as the adults fly about.

However, that all being said, the photo doesn't have enough detail for me to confidently identify the fly. As the post indicates you are in Indiana, I suggest you contact your local county extension office and submit some flies for identification. The link below contains a list of the county offices:
https://extension.purdue.edu/pages/Co...


Posted by: Michael Skvarla (2 points) Michael Skvarla
Posted: October 6, 2017

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Dion Graber commented,
You were right Michael and David. I have identified what bugs were on the plants and they are shore flies. I checked for other bugs on the plants again and that is all I found. I contacted IPM Labs and got some beneficials for shore flies. Thank you so much for your time and knowledge. I am still trying to figure out what is causing the holes on the leaves. I also did check under the leaves very carefully with a magnify glass and found nothing. Thanks again for your time.
2 months ago.

David Hughes commented,
Thanks so much for coming back and confirming that. Very valuable to have heard about the confirmation. Let us know how we can help in the future
2 months ago.



0
points
I also think these are shore flies.

I wonder could the leave damage be the result of oedema? That is a physiological condition due to overwatering where cells rupture causing yellowing and sometimes holes

http://extension.illinois.edu/focus/i...

Is the damage greater on the underside of the leaves (obviously not the hole)


Posted by: David Hughes (141 points) David Hughes
Posted: October 6, 2017

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